Invited Speakers

Invited Plenary Speakers

Susan  Goldin-Meadow

Susan Goldin-Meadow

The University of Chicago

Susan Goldin-Meadow is the Beardsley Ruml Distinguished Service Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Comparative Human Development and the Committee on Education at the University of Chicago. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, where she worked with Rochel Gelman and Lila Gleitman. Her research is two-pronged: (1) The home-made gestures that profoundly deaf children create when not exposed to sign language and (2) The gestures hearing speakers around the globe spontaneously produce when they talk. These co-speech gestures provide insight into how we talk and think.



Abstract

 

Steven O. Roberts

Steven O. Roberts

Stanford University

Steven O. Roberts is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.  He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan where he worked with Susan Gelman. His research focuses on the development and expression of social biases, particularly those involving race. He also explores how we conceptualize social groups and how our concepts guide how we perceive and evaluate individuals. Broadly, his work centers around group-based boundaries and hierarchies.


Abstract

How to make a racist

 

Invited Symposia

Early Career Symposium

Chair: Kristina Olson, Princeton University

Lucia Alcala

Lucia Alcala

California State University, Fullerton

Dr. Lucia Alcalá earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of California Santa Cruz (2014). She was a visiting professor at the Universidad Maya de Quintana Roo and was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship by the University of California Institute for Mexico and the United States at UC Riverside to conduct research in Yucatán México (2015) prior to joining the Department of Psychology at California State University Fullerton. Dr. Alcalá conducts empirical research in the US and Mexico, guided by sociocultural theory to examine cross-cultural variations of children’s cognitive development and prosocial behavior in the U.S. and Mexico.

Viridiana Benitez

Viridiana Benitez

Arizona State University

Viridiana L. Benitez, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in Psychology at Arizona State University. Benitez’s research focuses on how young children learn words, how they track the statistical patterns of their environment, and how language experience, such as bilingualism, affects word learning and cognition. To answer these questions, Benitez works with infants, children, and adults with monolingual or bilingual language experiences. Benitez holds a bachelor’s in psychology (University of Houston), a doctorate in developmental psychology (Indiana University), and completed a postdoctoral fellowship (University of Wisconsin-Madison). As a bicultural bilingual and first-generation college graduate, Benitez also strives to make academia more diverse and inclusive.

Ariel Starr

Ariel Starr

University of Washington

Ariel Starr is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington. Previously, she completed her PhD at Duke University and a postdoctoral fellowship at UC Berkeley. Dr. Starr’s lab uses behavioral and eye-tracking methods to study the origins of human knowledge. In particular, they are interested in how language, memory, and conceptual development interact in infancy and early childhood to give rise to uniquely human cognitive abilities.

Amber Williams

Amber Williams

California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Amber D. Williams is an Assistant Professor in Psychology and Child Development at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. She obtained her B.A. at Rice University and her M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin, where she studied parent’s racial socialization practices and children’s racial attitudes and cross-race friendships. She currently studies the development of racial attitudes and identity in children and adolescents.

Taking trust seriously: Sources of vulnerability and protection

Chair: Melissa Koenig, University of Minnesota

Melissa Koenig

Melissa Koenig

University of Minnesota

Melissa Koenig examines the impact of testimony on cognitive development.  Dr. Koenig and her team present children with the need to make decisions that require different forms of trust using a range of methods across cultures, contexts and interpersonal relationships.   Dr. Koenig is first-generation college student who studied Linguistics and Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin.  After completing post-doctoral fellowships at Harvard and the University of Chicago, she joined the faculty at the Institute of Child Development in 2007, and has been a Full Professor there since 2016.

Asheley R. Landrum

Asheley R. Landrum

Texas Tech University

Asheley R. Landrum is an assistant professor of science communication in the College of Media & Communication at Texas Tech University and a media psychologist.  Her research investigates how values and worldviews influence people’s selection and processing of information about science and how these phenomena develop from childhood into adulthood. She is a principal investigator on two National Science Foundation-funded grants with her public media collaborators that focus on increasing engagement with educational science media.

Kang Lee

Kang Lee

University of Toronto

Dr. Kang Lee is a professor at the University of Toronto and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in developmental neuroscience. He has mainly focused on two major issues. The first is the development of moral cognition and action with a specific focus on honesty and deception. Currently, his lab is exploring the development of academic cheating and how to reduce it. The second is the development of social perception with a specific focus on face processing. For over two decades, he has used behavioral and neuroscience methods (e.g., EEG, fMRI, fNIRS) to examine how infants, children, and adults process own- vs. other-race faces and the linkage between face perception and racial biases. Currently, his lab is exploring how to reduce racial biases in childhood.

Tara Mandalaywala

Tara Mandalaywala

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Tara M. Mandalaywala is an Assistant Professor of Developmental Science in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research examines the developmental origins of prejudice and bias by investigating how young children think about social categories and identities, and the environmental factors that shape children’s socio-cognitive development.

Children’s Understanding of Race and Racism

Chair: Maureen Callanan, University of California, Santa Cruz

Kristin Pauker

Kristin Pauker

University of Hawaii

Kristin Pauker is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Hawaii and director of the ISP lab. She received her A.B. from Dartmouth College (2002), Ph.D. from Tufts University (2009), and completed postdoctoral study at Stanford University. Originally born and raised in Hawaii, she became fascinated with exploring how a person’s immediate environment and culturally-shaped theories about race impact basic social perception, social interactions, and stereotyping in childhood and throughout development. Her research spans both Social and Developmental Psychology and has been widely published in academic journals (e.g., ScienceJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, Developmental Psychology) and featured in the media (e.g., New York Times, New York Magazine, Time Magazine). She has been the recipient of a Board of Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Research and a Board of Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Teaching from the University of Hawaii, and her work has been supported with almost $1 million in combined support from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. 

Sylvia Perry

Sylvia Perry

Northwestern University

Sylvia Perry is an Assistant Professor of social psychology and medical social sciences (by courtesy), and a Faculty Associate for the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. She investigates how racial bias awareness develops, and the implications of bias awareness for prejudice reduction, intergroup contact, and parental racial socialization.

Mike Rizzo

Mike Rizzo

New York University

Michael T. Rizzo is a postdoctoral research fellow at New York University working with Marjorie Rhodes. His current research examines the psychological processes and developmental mechanisms underlying the development of racial biases in early childhood and how to disrupt this process.

Onnie Rogers

Onnie Rogers

Northwestern University

Dr. Onnie Rogers, is a developmental psychologist and identity scholar whose research curiosities converge at the intersection of human development, diversity and equity, and education. Dr. Rogers is interested in social and educational inequities and the mechanisms through which macro-level disparities are both perpetuated and disrupted at the micro-level of identities and relationships. Her research centers on the perspectives and experiences of racially/ethnically diverse children and adolescents in school settings. As a professor and a researcher, Dr. Rogers advocates for gender equity with an intersectional lens and does research on race and gender, and their role in identity development among youth in urban contexts. Dr. Rogers was named a 2018 “Emerging Scholar” by Diverse Issues in Higher Education and a Rising Star of 2017 by the American Psychological Association.