Pre-Conference Workshops

All workshops will be held on Thursday, April 21 at Monona Terrace Conference Center

All Day Workshops

Working toward a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive cognitive developmental science

8:30am – 4:00pm

Sponsored by:
Cognitive Development Society

Organizer:
Steven Roberts, Stanford University
Jasmine De Jesus, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Confirmed Speakers:

Sakaria Auelua-Toomey, Stanford University
Tissyana Camacho, California State University
Clare Conry-Murray, Saint Joseph’s University
Kathleen Corriveau, Boston University
Jocelyn Dautel, Queen’s University Belfast
Margaret Echelbarger, University of Chicago
Liz Gunderson, Temple University
Campbell Leaper, University of California, Santa Cruz
Zoe Liberman, University of California, Santa Barbara
Elizabeth Mortenson, Stanford University
Nora Newcombe, Temple University
Mark Nielsen, University of Queensland
Moin Syed, University of Minnesota
Monica Tsethlikai, Arizona State University
Makeba Wilbourn, Duke University

 

Workshop Summary:
This invited pre-conference brings together scholars from a variety of backgrounds to have an open and candid discussion about diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) within the field and society. There will be four panels in total, each followed by an open discussion about the issues and ways to remedy them. These panels will address DEI from: 1) international perspectives (e.g., challenges in building international collaborations; US-centric biases in the publication process), 2) race and ethnicity perspectives (e.g., perspectives of native and non-native scholars in cognitive development, the consequences of a racially homogenous leadership), 3) gender and sexuality perspectives (e.g., the past and future of women in CDS; gendered divisions of labor), and 4) institutional perspectives (e.g., R1 biases in the publication process; inequality in research funding). Each panel will leave lots of room for discussion, so that all attendees, no matter their expertise or background, can have the space and time to share their own perspectives. At the end of the day, Barbara Rogoff will integrate the perspectives from each panel, and will provide recommendations for the future.

*Cost:
$55 for all attendees

Includes lunch and coffee breaks


Balancing trust and skepticism in the times of fake news: The development of epistemic reasoning and intellectual humility

8:30am – 4:25pm

Organizers:

Azzura Ruggeri, Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Samuel Ronfard, University of Toronto
Joshua Rottman, Franklin & Marshall College
Andrei Cimpian, New York University
Candice Mills, The University of Texas at Dallas

Confirmed Speakers:
Andrei Cimpian, New York University
Candice Mills, The University of Texas at Dallas
Caren Walker, University of California, San Diego
Simona Ghetti, University of California, Davis
David Sobel, Brown University
Tenelle Porter, University of Pennsylvania
Michal Reifen Tagar, Reichman University
Jamie Jirout, University of Virginia
Lisa Fazio, Vanderbilt University
Tamar Kushnir, Duke University
Pearl Han Li, University of Minnesota

 

Workshop Summary:

The Internet has made learning new content faster than ever: You can now ask your questions to Google—in the same way you would ask questions to your mother, teacher, or nerdy best friend—and get answers in an instant. However, this does not necessarily make finding the information one is looking for easier: One has to know what kinds of questions to ask, how to ask those questions effectively and reliably, how to filter and interpret the results one obtains, and how to use this information to determine when querying should stop.

Epistemic curiosity and reasoning (i.e., the desire to resolve uncertainty about the world, as well as the competence in doing so) and intellectual humility (i.e., the disposition to recognize the fallibility and limits of our knowledge and to appreciate alternative perspectives) are both crucial to this process, and may have a strong impact on our learning at the individual and at the societal level.

In this sense, fostering and supporting these competencies is of immense interest to parents, teachers, and policymakers alike. Among other benefits, developing strong epistemic reasoning skills and virtues could be the antidote for the hyper-polarization of beliefs, one of the most vexing challenges our society is facing, engendered by the information age and the advent of fake news. Extreme polarization undermines the possibility of productive compromise and can eventually lead to gridlock.

This pre-conference workshop aims to stimulate interest in taking a cognitive developmental perspective on children’s epistemic attitudes, and to foster a rich interdisciplinary dialogue. With this goal, the pre-conference will bring together an international group of developmental, cognitive, educational, and political psychologists at different career stages who have adopted diverse methods and theoretical frameworks to advance our understanding of epistemic reasoning and intellectual humility in childhood.

View the workshop website for more information.

*Cost:
Complimentary registration
Includes breakfast, lunch, coffee and snacks

Please note there is a maximum capacity for this workshop.  Kindly only register if you intend to attend.

 

 


Theory-Theory turns 30-something: Reflections and new directions

9:00am – 4:15pm

Organizers:
Kara Weisman, University of California, Riverside
Kirsten Lesage, Boston University
Kathleen Corriveau, Boston University
Rebekah Richert, University of California, Riverside


Confirmed Speakers:
Kirsten Lesage, Boston University
Kara Weisman, University of California, Riverside
Susan Gelman, University of Michigan
Alison Gopnik, University of California, Berkeley
Henry Wellman, University of Michigan
Florencia Anggoro, College of the Holy Cross
Julian Jara-Ettinger,Yale University
Kristin Shutts, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jinjing Jenny Wang, Rutgers University
Michelene Chi, Arizona State University
John Coley, Northeastern University
Tamsin German, University of California, Santa Barbara
Paul Harris, Harvard University
Chuck Kalish, University of Wisconsin-Madison



Workshop Summary:

Theory-theory has had tremendous reach within cognitive developmental science and beyond, extending from its early roots in “folk psychology,” “folk biology,” and “naive physics,” to more recent explorations of the development of “intuitive sociology,” “folk anthropology,” “intuitive archeology,” “folk philosophy of mind,” and so on. In this pre-conference, the CDS community is invited to come together to reflect on how this theoretical perspective has evolved over the past three decades, how the diversification of our methods and content areas has pushed this collective research program forward, and what questions and controversies remain to be explored.

The day will begin with a structured mentorship program between junior and senior scholars, followed by a “fireside chat” discussion with the authors of two of the seminal papers that popularized theory-theory among cognitive developmentalists: Drs. Susan Gelman, Alison Gopnik, and Henry Wellman. In a keynote symposium we will hear from leading scholars on some of the cutting-edge research that is pushing the field’s understanding of “folk theories” forward, including work on how language and culture shape folk biology (Dr. Florencia Anggoro), work employing computational modeling and cultural comparison (Dr. Julian Jara-Ettinger), work on “folk sociology” (Dr. Kristin Shutts), and work on children’s active information seeking (Dr. Jinjing Jenny Wang). After a leisurely lunch, we will host a second “fireside chat” discussion with senior scholars whose work has defined, transformed, and challenged “theory-theory,” including Drs. Michelene Chi, John Coley, Tamsin German, Paul Harris, and Chuck Kalish. The day will conclude with a “flash talk” session and a poster session featuring new and ongoing work by early-career researchers.

 

*Cost:
$35 for students
$45 for post docs, pre-tenure researchers, junior faculty, and research staff
$55 for all others
Includes breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks


 

Big team science for studying small people

9:00am – 4:30pm

Organizers:
Heidi Baumgartner, Stanford University
Melissa Kline Struhl, Lookit & MIT
Michael Frank, Stanford University

Confirmed Speakers:
Heidi Baumgartner, ManyBabies
Michael Frank, Stanford University
Melissa Kline Struhl, Lookit & MIT
Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University
Aaron Chuey, Stanford University
Nicholas Coles, Psychological Science Accelerator
Moira Dillon, New York University
Rick Gilmore, The Pennsylvania State University
Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton University
Mark Sheskin, Minerva University
Kasey Soska, New York University

Workshop Summary:

The growth in recent years of ‘Big Team Science’ (BTS) networks in developmental psychology (and beyond) has allowed scientists to come together to conduct projects and create tools that are beyond the scope of any individual lab. Collaborative networks such as the Open Science Collaboration, the Psychological Science Accelerator (PSA), and ManyBabies (MB) have produced large-scale replications and expansions of landmark findings. Further, groups like Children Helping Science (CHS), Lookit, and Databrary have created novel tools and infrastructure for collecting and sharing data.

As these developmental BTS organizations have grown and matured, they have unlocked new potential for collaborations and best practices, but they have also uncovered new challenges. These organizations are increasingly working together and incorporating insights gained from BTS collaborations beyond developmental psychology (e.g., from the PSA) to address these challenges and advance their missions. This workshop will bring these groups together as a ‘network of networks’ to present their findings, discuss successes and challenges, and share best practices and guidance for conducting and participating in large-scale collaborations and/or using the tools developed by these organizations.

This pre-conference will consist of research talks and updates from members of MB, PLAY, Databrary, Lookit, and CHS, and practical tutorials on how to get involved in BTS and use the research tools and infrastructure developed by these organizations. Current members of these groups AND anyone interested in getting involved will benefit from the workshop and leave with a better understanding of the opportunities and challenges of conducting Bigger Team Science for Small People.

View the workshop website for more information.

*Cost:
Free with registration for Students and Postdocs
$20 for faculty
Includes lunch and coffee breaks

Sponsored by

Morning Workshops

Developing judgments of possibility: What have we learnt and what have we yet to discover?

8:00am – 12:00pm

Organizers:
Ayse Payir,
Boston University
Paul L Harris, Harvard University
Kathleen Corriveau, Boston University

 

Confirmed Speakers:

Karl Rosengren, University of Rochester
Samuel Ronfard, University of Toronto at Mississauga
David Menendez, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Deena Weisberg, Villanova University
Brandon Goulding, University of Toronto at Mississauga
Jenny Nissel, University of Texas at Austin
Andrew Shtulman, Occidental College
Ayse Payir, Boston University

Workshop Summary:

The ability to reason about what can and cannot happen is an invaluable skill in a complex world. It guides much of our behavior in daily life, informs our understanding of the world, and helps us envision the future (Harris, 2020; Shtulman & Philips, 2017). Consequently, it is viewed as one of the key processes in cognitive development and has long been of interest to developmental researchers. In this workshop, we will communicate our latest findings in this domain to a larger audience and brainstorm fruitful avenues for future research in light of past and current evidence. We will also give junior researchers an opportunity to present their research and network with scholars in this area.

The workshop will begin with a talk from Karl Rosengren, titled “Imagining the Impossible: Past, Present, and Future.” Dr. Rosengren will reflect on how the field has changed in the 20+ years since the publication of “Imagining the Impossible” (Rosengren, Johnson, & Harris, 2000). We will continue our workshop with two consecutive panels. The speakers in the first panel (Samuel Ronfard, David Menendez, Deena Weisberg) will present research on how children judge unlikely and fantastical phenomena based on the context and/or stimuli and the implications of these judgments for children’s educational attainment. The speakers in the second panel (Brandon Goulding, Jenny Nissel, Andrew Shtulman, Ayse Payir) will present research on the possibility judgments made by children and adults from different cultures. We will conclude these panels with a discussion by Andrew Shtulman and move to data blitz talks by junior researchers. Our workshop will end with conversational roundtables that will bring together researchers at different stages of their careers. We hope that this workshop will be a catalyst for new research via fostering new collaborations among scholars from across the world.

View the workshop website for more information.

 Cost:
$30 for students
$40 for postdocs
$55 for all others

Includes one coffee break

Afternoon Workshops

Career paths beyond the tenure track for Cognitive and Developmental scientists

1:00pm – 4:30pm

Organizer: Vanessa Simmering, ATLAS, University of Kansas

Workshop Summary:

Research on cognition and development has far-reaching implications, but many graduate students are trained with only a faculty career in mind. Academic skills such as research design, project management, statistical analysis, publishing, grant-writing, teaching, and student mentorship are broadly applicable, but graduate and post-doctoral training often does not address translating these skills to other work environments. Scholars who want to explore non-faculty careers may not know where to turn for guidance.

The goal of this professional development workshop is to provide an opportunity for scholars to (1) learn about the process of finding and applying for appropriate positions, (2) develop ways to present their skills to prospective employers, and (3) network with other scholars in similar situations. The session will be led by Dr. Carissa Shafto (data scientist, Brightfield Strategies) and Dr. Vanessa Simmering (research associate, ATLAS research center, University of Kansas) who have worked in both academia and industry, providing them with insights into the similarities and differences in these career paths.

The workshop will begin with a series of narrated slides from more than a dozen cognitive and developmental scientists describing their varied career paths, followed by an overview of how to match skills and interests with careers. Participants will work individually and in small groups to develop concise and compelling descriptions of what they are looking for in a job and what they have to offer as a candidate. We will then describe the process of finding and applying for different types of jobs, concluding with an opportunity for open discussion of any remaining questions and concerns about finding the right career path for them.

View the workshop website for more information.

*Cost:
$20 for students and post docs
$40 for faculty
Includes one coffee break

Sponsored by


Digital media and cognitive development

1:00pm – 4:00pm

Organizers:
Koeun Choi,
Virginia Tech
Heather Kirkorian, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Confirmed Speakers:

Koeun Choi, Virginia Tech
Heather Kirkorian, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Rachel Barr, Georgetown University
Jonathan Kominsky, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Alex Bonus, Ohio State University
Cassie (Cassondra) Eng, Carnegie Mellon University
Martina Rau, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Judith Danovitch, University of Louisville
Ying Xu, University of California, Irvine

Workshop Summary:

Digital media represent an influence in children’s lives that have effects on varying levels of cognition, learning, and social interaction, and which, to an increasing degree, crosscuts socioeconomic strata. This workshop will build on the success of our 2017 and 2019 CDS workshops on Digital Media & Cognitive Development, which had 91 registrants in total (47 in 2017 including 19 faculty, 10 postdocs, 18 graduate students; 44 in 2019 including 19 faculty, 3 postdocs, 22 graduate students). The proposed workshop Digital Media and Cognitive Development comes at a critical time as researchers grapple with the theoretical and practical implications of digital media for cognitive development while navigating challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This workshop will convene top scholars in cognitive development broadly and those who study the impact of digital media specifically. Additionally, this workshop will provide infrastructure for mentoring early-career scholars who are interested in digital media and cognitive development. The current research landscape will be weighed in three panels of speakers: Studying Digital Media and Cognitive Development During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Panel 1), Screen Media and Cognitive Development (Panel 2), and Emerging Technologies and Cognitive Development (Panel 3). In addition, workshop attendees will have the opportunity to share their own research during a poster session that is designed to connect junior scholars, emerging scholars, and top researchers in one-on-one discussions. As in 2017 and 2019, we will also match junior scholars with established researchers for informal mentoring.

View the workshop website for more information.

*Cost
$35 for students
$55 for post docs and faculty
Includes one coffee break

Thank you to our Sponsors & Exhibitors!